Beauty of God’s Plan and Presence of Holy Spirit: In the Life of Mary

91

God’s plan for Mary was great. He chose her in a special way and she cooperated with him towards the accomplishment of the plan by leading all the faithful to God. She achieved it primarily as Mother who lovingly gave birth to and nurtured her Son.[1] A person called to religious life must willingly cooperate with God’s plan, after the sublime example of Virgin Mary. A consecrated person has to accept God’s plan and surrender his own, and thus remain faithful to God’s plan. Both vocations, that of Mary and that of religious, are in accordance with the fulfilment of the divine plan and, therefore, they should willingly collaborate with the divine plan. In Mary’s life we see that her life was a total surrender to the plan of God. Every religious, too, must make Mary his/her model.[2]

The Holy Spirit prepared Mary to be the Mother of God. Mary gave her consent to give God a human nature. God became man in her virginal womb by the power of the Holy Spirit. God consecrated Mary by the power of the Holy Spirit. Therefore, Mary is the model par excellence, because she fully surrendered herself to be consecrated by the Spirit. Following the example of Mary, all consecrated are invited to become bearers of Christ. After the Ascension of Jesus, when Mary and the disciples were in the upper room in profound prayer, the power of the Spirit, in forms of tongues of fire, empowered  them with strength and courage (Act 1:14). As on the day of Annunciation, the Holy Spirit, who over showed her to be the Mother of the physical Christ, will fill and empower her on the day of Pentecost to be the mother of the Mystical body Christ- the Church. [3]

Mary was filled with the power of the Spirit because of which she could sing the praises of God. As consecrated persons, we too are called to move as the Spirit leads us. When we move according to the Spirit’s action plan, everything becomes possible. For example, a prophet is a person who is led by the Spirit, filled with the Spirit, and empowered by the Spirit.[4] For Eusebio Hernadez, “ Like Mary, the first consecrated woman, who in  virtue of the Holy Spirit and her total self-giving, brought Christ into the world  to redeem it through a loving self-sacrifice, consecrated persons, who remain  open to the  Spirit, today  are called to stake everything  on charity, “ living the commandment  of a practical  and concrete  love for every human being.”[5]  Consecrated people are to sacrifice their own selves to give themselves to the other people. It can be done only in pure love and Mary is our model who lovingly and faithfully listened to the promptings of the Spirit.

Davis E. Rosage states “Mary’s openness to the Holy Spirit, her prayer-fullness and committed love make her an ideal model for us as we seek to discern and respond to the will of the Lord. We can begin to follow her example by heeding what her Son would tell us: “I am with you always, to the end of the age” (Mt 28: 20b).[6]  The transforming power of the Holy Spirit in the life of Mary will help our contemplation to realise, Mary as a perfect model as we strive to discern God’s will in our own lives. Mary remained firm in her response to the Lord in the form of ‘yes’ she had given to Angel Gabriel, thus becoming a source of great inspiration to all the consecrated through their ‘yes’ given on the day of their commitment.[7]


[1]  M. Hearden and Virgina M.K, Mary God Bearer to a World in Need, Eugene, Pickwick, 2013, p.  20.
[2] J.K. Morse, “Mary: The Prototype of Religious Life,” Sanyasa, 8, no. 1, 2013, pp.  21-29.
[3] Thaijasa, “Call and Crisis in the Life of Mary,” Mary Today, ed., Joy Kaipan, Bangalore, Kristu Jyoti, 2010, p. 41.
[4] K.  Clement, Secrets of the Prophetic: Unveiling your Future, Shippensburg:Destiny,  Image 2005, p. 14.
[5] E.  Hernandez, “Open to the Sprit,” L Osservatore Romano no. 26, 26th June 2002, pp.  1-3.
[6] D. E. Rosage, Mary Scar of the New Millennium, Michigan, Servant, 1997, p. 94.
[7] Rosage, Mary Scar of the New Millennium, p. 88.

What do you think?